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Events at the McFarland Center

Spring 2014

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Wednesday, January 29, 2014
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP LUNCH
A tale of two syndecans: studies on cell adhesion and breast cancer — Robert Bellin, associate professor of biology, will discuss some of the recent research in his lab on a group of proteins called syndecans, their role in cell adhesion and relation to breast cancer. To attend, faculty must RSVP to phinchli@holycross.edu no later than January 22.
Noon-1 p.m., Hogan Suites B/C

 

Thursday, January 30, 2014
The Scientist's RolePhilip Kitcher, John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, will discuss how the sciences have come to play a major part in shaping national and global policy and the ethical issues that have surfaced as a result. His talk will focus on examples of Darwinism and climate change. His talk is part of a series on "The Practice of Science in a World of Competing Values."
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
“Do I Look Illegal?” Race, Immigration, and U.S. Political Culture — Matthew Frye Jacobson is the William Robertson Coe Professor of American Studies & History and professor of African American studies at Yale University. He is the author of five books on race, immigration, and U.S. political culture. Part of the series "Race and National Imaginaries in the Americas," co-sponsored with Latin American and Latino Studies, and the Carson Lecture Series.
7 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Thursday, February 27, 2014
Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them — Joshua Greene, the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and director of the Moral Cognition Lab at Harvard University, will discuss themes in his recent book, “Moral Tribes”  (Penguin Press, 2013). Greene breaks down cutting-edge neuroscience and cognitive techniques to shows us when to trust our instincts, when to reason, and how the right kind of reasoning can move us forward. Co-sponsored with Montserrat , and the departments of Psychology and Philosophy. Learn more.
7 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
Dacia Maraini's "Chiara di Assisi: In Praise of Disobedience" —Celebrated Italian writer Dacia Maraini will talk about her latest book on Saint Claire (Santa Chiara). Maraini's long and prolific writing career has produced many novels — including "Woman at War" (1975) and the international bestseller "The Silent Duchess" (1990) — and scores of plays, essays, collections of poetry, and investigative journalism. Her work most often focuses on women, children and major social issues. Co-sponsored with Italian and Montserrat (Global Society).
7 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Anti-Haitian Exclusionism in the Dominican Republic: A Biopolitical Turn? — Sam Martinez, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Connecticut, will speak on the recent court ruling in the Dominican Republic that denies citizenship to residents of Haitian descent. Martinez has written two ethnographic monographs and several peer-reviewed articles on the migration and labor and minority rights of Haitian nationals and people of Haitian ancestry in the Dominican Republic. Part of the series "Race and National Imaginaries in the Americas," co-sponsored with Latin American and Latino Studies and the Carson Lecture Series.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Thursday, March 13, 2014
"Our Catastrophe is Here at Hand": The Jesuit Suppression — Robert Maryks, visiting scholar at the Jesuit Institute at Boston College and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Jesuit Studies, will speak about the causes and history of the 18th-century expulsion of the Society of Jesus from Roman Catholic nations in Europe. Maryks is author of “Saint Cicero and the Jesuits (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700)" (Ashgate, 2008) and co-editor with Jonathan Wright of the forthcoming "Jesuit Survival and Restoration" (Brill, 2014).
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Monday, March 17, 2014
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP LUNCH
The Inca Strikes Back: Drugs & Culture Wars in South America — Caroline Yezer, assistant professor of anthropology, will speak about her recent co-edited volume on post-war ethnography and reconciliation in Ayacucho, Peru as well as her current work on the efforts by indigenous coca growers in Peru's highland jungles to decriminalize coca leaf as a drug and reclassify it as a cultural right. To attend, faculty must RSVP to phinchli@holycross.edu no later than March 10.
Noon-1 p.m., Hogan Suite A

 

Thursday, March 20, 2014
Food that Divides, Food that Unites: Meals in Jewish and Christian Tradition — Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus, professor and chair of religion and coordinator of Jewish Studies at Wheaton College, has written extensively on meals in Jewish and early Christian tradition and contributes regularly to the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery. He is the author of the forthcoming book "More Than Kosher." Supported by the Kraft-Hiatt Fund for Jewish-Christian Understanding.
7 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Lisa DodsonThursday, March 27, 2014
American Poverty and a Moral Underground — Lisa Dodson is a research professor in sociology at Boston College and author of "The Moral Underground: How Ordinary People Subvert an Unfair Economy" (The New Press, 2011). She will speak about the conflicts that many Americans are experiencing in the context of deepening poverty and inequality.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Friday-Saturday, March 28-29, 2014
Celebrating Philosophy: A Dialogue on the Nature of Morality, Reality, and Knowledge — In this two-day undergraduate conference, distinguished student presenters from a broad range of colleges and universities come together to  discuss Divinity & Morality; the Rationality of Religious Belief; Mind, Perception & Knowledge; Art, Morality & The Social Sphere; Forgiveness and Repentance; Philosophy & The Arts; and finally, Vernunft! Owen Flanagan, the James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Neurobiology at Duke University, will offer the keynote address on "Varieties of Moral Possibilities." Flanagan will make a case for cross-cultural philosophy and discuss whether and how it might make us more humble and tolerant, as well as provide rich resources for moral reflection and deep social critique. Co-sponsored by the McFarland Center, the Office of the Dean, and the Department of Philosophy.
View the schedule.

 

Monday, March 31, 2014
Feminism, Theology, and the Bible: The Scholarship of Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza and Why It Matters — In advance of Schüssler Fiorenza’s lecture here on April 10, Holy Cross faculty and students are invited to read and discuss her writing.  A faculty panel (Matthew Eggemeier, Mary Hobgood, Caroline Johnson Hodge, and Tat-siong Benny Liew) will share briefly their thoughts on Schüssler Fiorenza's scholarship and facilitate the discussion.  The reading will be circulated in advance and lunch will be served, so advance registration is necessary. Email phinchli@holycross.edu by March 21. Co-sponsored with Class of 1956 Chair in New Testament Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, and the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies.
Noon, Hogan Suite A

 

CJ PascoeWednesday, April 2, 2014
Notes on a Moral Masculinity: Rethinking Relationships between Homophobia, Heterosexism and Sexual Violence — Sociologist CJ Pascoe is assistant professor at the University of Oregon and author of "Dude You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School" (University of California Press, 2007). Her work focuses on gender, youth, homophobia, sexuality and new media. Co-sponsored with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and the Committee on Sexual Assault Facts and Education (SAFER).
7 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Thursday-Friday, April 3-4, 2014
Adam Smith: Moral Philosopher and Economic Theorist —This two-day conference will explore the ethical, political and economic thought of Adam Smith, the 18th century Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneer of political economy. Keynote speakers are Charles Griswold, Jr., a prominent Smith scholar and professor of philosophy at Boston University, and Ryan Patrick Hanley, associate professor of political science at Marquette University. Part of the Charles Carroll Program, this event is co-sponsored with the Department of Political Science and the McFarland Center.
View the schedule.

 

Paige ReynoldsMonday, April 7, 2014
"the strong critical view": Catholic Practice, Modern Fiction, and the Irish Woman Writer — Paige Reynolds, professor of English at the College of the Holy Cross, will focus on the fiction of 20th-century Irish Catholic writers Kate O’Brien and Mary Lavin and will examine how these Irish women writers represent the practice of prayer. According to Reynolds, their work undermines the long-standing claim that literary modernism was categorically hostile toward or indifferent to religion. This lecture is part of the initiative Catholics & Cultures and is one of the Deitchman Family Lectures on Religion and Modernity.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
Prophetic Rhetoric in the Public Square — M. Cathleen Kaveny, Endowed Professor of Law and Theology at Boston College, will analyze both effective and divisive forms of prophetic speech and suggest ways to identify and manage the tension between truth and civility. One of the Deitchman Family Lectures for Religion and Modernity.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014
The Apocalypse of John: Its World of Vision and Our Own?  — Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, the Krister Stendahl Professor of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School, will discuss the Book of Revelation’s world of vision and ask whether it proclaims God’s word as a word of liberating justice or as a word of vengeance and destruction. Note: Prior to this talk, a panel discussion on Fiorenza's work, titled "Feminism, Theology, and the Bible: The Scholarship of Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza and Why It Matters," will be held for Holy Cross faculty and students at noon on Monday, March 31. Co-sponsored with the Class of 1956 Chair in New Testament Studies.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014
Vocation of the Writer – American novelist and essayist Siri Hustvedt is the author of internationally bestselling novels “What I Loved” and “The Summer Without Men.” Her latest novel, “The Blazing World,” will be released in March. She has also published three collections of essays and nonfiction work including, “The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves.” She is the recipient of the 2012 International Gabarron Prize for Thought and Humanities. Co-sponsored with the Creative Writing Series.
7:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Affirmative Action for Latinos — Jorge J. E. Gracia is Samuel P. Capen Chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor in the departments of Philosophy and Comparative Literature at SUNY Buffalo. He has written and edited more than 40 books, including “Surviving Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the Twenty-First Century” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005), “Hispanic/Latino Identity: A Philosophical Perspective” (Blackwell, 2000), and the forthcoming “Latinos in America: Philosophy and Social Identity.” Part of the series "Race and National Imaginaries in the Americas," co-sponsored with Latin American and Latino Studies, and the Carson Lecture Series.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP LUNCH
From Self to Other and Beyond: Sketch of a Holy Cross Vocation — Mark Freeman, professor and chair of psychology as well as Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Society, will discuss the arc of his career at the College, focusing on both the continuities and discontinuities of his scholarly interests and pursuits.  His recent books include “Hindsight: The Promise and Peril of Looking Backward” (Oxford, 2010) and “The Priority of the Other: Thinking and Living Beyond the Self “ (Oxford, 2014). To attend, faculty must email phinchli@holycross.edu no later than April 9.
Noon-1 p.m., Hogan Suite A

 

CANCELED Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Stigmata on the Hudson: the Strange Tale of Sister Thorn — Paula Kane ’80, a former Holy Cross trustee, is Marous Chair of Catholic Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She will engage the audience in a discussion on themes in her new book "Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America" (University of North Carolina Press, 2013). Co-sponsored with the The Alexander F. Carson Lecture Series.
4:30 p.m., Rehm Library

 

Browse the breadth and quality of past presenters and programs by viewing our Events Archive.
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